HisashiNojima

Last Updated :2019/09/09

Affiliations, Positions
Graduate School of Letters, ., Professor
E-mail
nojimahiroshima-u.ac.jp

Basic Information

Major Professional Backgrounds

  • 2015/04/01, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Letters , Professor
  • 2007/04/01, 2015/03/31, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Letters , Associate Professor
  • 2004/04/01, 2007/03/31, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Letters , Associate Professor
  • 1990/06/15, 2004/03/31, The Kyoto Prefecture Research Center For Archaeological Properties, The Kyoto Prefecture Research Center For Archaeological Properties, researcher

Educational Backgrounds

  • Hiroshima University, Graduate School, Division of Letters, Archaeology, Japan, 1988/04, 1990/03
  • Hiroshima University, Faculty of Literature, Archaeology, Japan, 1984/04, 1988/03

Academic Degrees

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Hiroshima University
  • Master of Arts, Hiroshima University

Research Fields

  • Humanities;History;Archaeology

Research Keywords

  • Chiefdom Societies
  • Burial Mounds in the Yayoi Period
  • The Yayoi Period
  • Iron Culture
  • The Kofun Period
  • Casting Iron Hardware
  • Archaeology
  • Ritual Deposit Site
  • Excavation
  • Forged Iron Hardware

Educational Activity

Course in Charge

  1. 2019, Undergraduate Education, 4Term, Theory of Museum Collection B
  2. 2019, Undergraduate Education, 1Term, General Introduction to Japanese Archaeology
  3. 2019, Undergraduate Education, 2Term, Lecture on Japanese Archaeology C
  4. 2019, Undergraduate Education, 4Term, Lecture on Japanese Archaeology D
  5. 2019, Undergraduate Education, 2Term, Basic Practice in Archaeology A
  6. 2019, Undergraduate Education, OutOfTerm(1st), Field Practice in Archaeology A
  7. 2019, Undergraduate Education, OutOfTerm(1st), Field Practice in Archaeology B
  8. 2019, Undergraduate Education, OutOfTerm(2nd), Field Practice in Archaeology C
  9. 2019, Undergraduate Education, 3Term, Advanced Seminar in Archaeology B
  10. 2019, Undergraduate Education, 2Term, Seminar in Graduation Thesis on Archaeology A
  11. 2019, Undergraduate Education, 3Term, Seminar in Graduation Thesis on Archaeology B
  12. 2019, Undergraduate Education, First Semester, Guidance on Graduation Thesis A
  13. 2019, Undergraduate Education, Second Semester, Guidance on Graduation Thesis B
  14. 2019, Undergraduate Education, Second Semester, Graduation Thesis
  15. 2019, Graduate Education (Master's Program) , 3Term, Seminar in Comparative Archaeology of Asia B
  16. 2019, Graduate Education (Master's Program) , 2Term, Paper review on archaeology B
  17. 2019, Graduate Education (Master's Program) , 4Term, Exercise in Archaeology B
  18. 2019, Graduate Education (Master's Program) , 1Term, Exercise in Archaeology C
  19. 2019, Graduate Education (Master's Program) , First Semester, Introduction to Geo-Environmental Studies
  20. 2019, Graduate Education (Master's Program) , First Semester, Special Research Tutorial I (Geo-Environmental Studies)
  21. 2019, Graduate Education (Master's Program) , Second Semester, Special Research Tutorial I (Geo-Environmental Studies)
  22. 2019, Graduate Education (Doctoral Program) , First Semester, Special Research Tutorial II (Geo-Environmental Studies)
  23. 2019, Graduate Education (Doctoral Program) , Second Semester, Special Research Tutorial II (Geo-Environmental Studies)

Research Activities

Academic Papers

  1. Archaeological Finds from Jinseki-kōgen Town, The INOHIRA Collection from Toyomatsu Village, Hiroshima University bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, no.9, 69-101, 20171031
  2. The Two Kinds of Decorated Ceramic Ware (Sue Ware) in the Collections of the Department of Archaeology, Hiroshima University: Kanjō hei and Torigata hei, Hiroshima University bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, No.9, 113-122, 20171031
  3. Events Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Hiroshima University Department of Archaeology, Hiroshima University, Bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, No.9, 123-127, 20171031
  4. Non-destructive analysis of ancient bimetal swords from western Asia by c-ray radiography and X-ray fluorescence, Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B, 407, 244-255, 20170711
  5. The Combination of Yayoi Period Handicraft Production, Hiroshima Unversity Graduate School of Letters Department of Archaeology, 247-258, 20161231
  6. The Reality of the Iron Culture in the Yayoi Period, The Iron in the Yayoi Period, 54-61, 20160423
  7. Bronze-Hilted Iron Swords of Western Asia Held at the Department of Archaeology, Hiroshima University, HIROSHIMA UNIVERSITY, BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ARCHAEOLOGY, 1-31, 20160931
  8. Iron Making and Iron Smithing in the Kofun Period, Japan, The Kofun Culture of Japan, 88-89, 20151221
  9. Experimental Iron Production using Limonite Ore, Hiroshima University, Bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, no.7, 85-91, 20150715
  10. Resignation of Kiyohide FURUSE, Professor at the Hiroshima University, Hiroshima University, Bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, no.7, 129-133, 20150715
  11. Emergence and Development of Burial Mounds in the Yayoi Period, as noted in excavations at the Satadani, Satadao Burial Mound Group, Hiroshima Prefecture, Hiroshima University, Bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, no.7, 1-12, 20150715
  12. Examples of Artifacts from the Nakayama Shell Midden: Nakayama I type Rice Kettle Ceramics, Hiroshima University, Bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, no.7, 109-126, 20150715
  13. Non-destructive Analysis of Ancient Bronze Swords Possessed at Archaeological Research Laboratory of Hiroshima University, Hiroshima University, Bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, no.7, 39-84, 20150715
  14. Disaster Archaeology Analysis : The 2014 Landslide and Archaeological Sites in Hiroshima, Hiroshima University, Bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, no.7, 128-128, 20150715
  15. Bronze-Hilted Iron Swords of Western Asia Held at the Department of Archaeology, Hiroshima University, 139-165, 20140301
  16. Iron Culture in the Yayoi Period from the View of the History of Related Studies: Giving a True Picture of the Role of Iron, 185, 183-210, 20140201
  17. An Excavation on SATADANI and SATADAO Burial Mounds in Shobara-city, Hiroshima (6th Year Field Campaign), 27-48, 20130301
  18. 2012 Supplementary Report of the Iran-Japan Joint Research Study of the Gorgan Material in the National Museum of Iran, Teheran, 71-88, 20121001
  19. Thecnology and Interchange; Prime Movers of Social Evolution in Amncient TANGO Aria, Japan, 21-30, 20121001
  20. Early Iron Age in the Coastal Area around the Sea of Japan, 61-71, 20120901
  21. An Excavation on SATADANI Burial Mounds in Shobara-city, Hiroshima (5th Year Field Campaign), 21-46, 20120301
  22. An Excavation on SATADANI Burial Mounds in Shobara-city, Hiroshima (4th Year Field Campaign), 23-38, 20110301
  23. Seashore Ritual Deposit Sites: Chitoseshim Site In Maizuru City, Kyoto, Hiroshima University, Bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, no.3, 69-97, 20110301
  24. Typology of the Iron Casting Axes Imported from China and Their Fragmentation in Yayoi Period, 6, 92-106, 20110301
  25. Preliminary Report of the Iran Japan Joint Reseach Study of the Gorgan Material in the National Museum of Iran, Tehran, 129-150, 20100801
  26. The Ritual Deposit Sites in Seashore in Kofun Period, Japan: Chitoseshimo site in Mizuru City, Kyoto, Hiroshima University, Bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, no.2, 75-93, 20100301
  27. Yayoi Period, 20100301
  28. Naguoka Site, Nagudani Site, Nagu Funbo, Naguoka Iseki Houkei Hariishibo, 24-29,69,70, 20100301
  29. An Excavation on SATADANI Burial Mounds in Shobara-city, Hiroshima (3th Year Field Campaign), 23-39, 20100301
  30. Iron Making and Distribution in the Late Yayoi Period, Japan, 79-94, 20090901
  31. Iron Culture in the Coastal Area of the Sea of Japan in the Yayoi Period, 11-29, 20090501
  32. Iron Implements, Thier Production and Distribution in the Yayoi Period, 6, 43-52, 20090401
  33. An Excavation on SATADANI Burial Mounds in Shobara-city, Hiroshima (2nd Year Field Campaign), 23(23-52), 20090320
  34. The Ritual Deposit Sites in Seashore in Kofun Period, Japan: Chitoseshimo site in Mizuru City, Kyoto, Hiroshima University, Bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, no.1, 1(123-146), 20090320
  35. Craft Specialization and Iron Culture in the Coastal Area of the Sea of Japan in the Yayoi Period, 20080906
  36. Iron Votive Offerings from the Ritual Deposit Sites in the Kofun Period, Japan, Journal of Historical Iron and Steel, 1-20, 20071231
  37. Archaeological Approach to Iron Tool Production in Ancient Japan, 141-156, 20071201
  38. Reconstruction of Residence Patterns at Kushiro Higashiyama Rock Shelter Site through Fkajes of Lithic Assemblages, 21, 51-62, 20070310
  39. The Segmentalized Swords, Koko-Ronshu= Essays on Archaeology in Honour of Professor Tetushi KAWAGOE, 347-360, 20051101
  40. Early Keyhoke-shaped Kofun and Iron Sword, Kikan Koukogaku(Archaeology Quaterly), 90, 11-14, 20050101
  41. The Iron Trade in the Coastal Area of the Sea of Japan from the Yayoi Period to the Kofun Period, The Interactions and the Regional Characteristics in the Coastal Area of the Sea of Japan from the View-point of Archaeology, 21-34, 20050101
  42. Regional Differences of Iron Weapons from The Late Yayoi Period to The Early Kofun Period, Koko-Ronshu= Essays on Archaeology in Honour of Masatoshi KAWASE, 541-552, 20040301
  43. Regional Differences of Iron Weapons from The Late Yayoi Period to The Early Kofun Period, Kodai Buki Kenkyu (Archaeological Studies in Ancient Weapons), 4, 54-60, 20031001
  44. An Essay of Burial Iron Goods in the Yayoi Period, Journal of Archaeology, 491, 6-10, 20020801
  45. An Essay on the Emergence of Early Iron Metallurgy and Iron Prestige Items in Burials in the Yayoi Period of the “Tango” Area., The Dazzle of Blue Glass: The Tango Culture Emerges, 88-93, 20020401
  46. The Beads and the Iron, The Manufacturing Technique of Beads and Long-distance Trade, Cultura Antiqua, 53(4), 37-51, 20010401
  47. An Essay on Time Frame of Kinghood, Archaeological Studies in Kyoto Prefecture, 4, 167-176, 20010301
  48. Iron Trade in the Yayoi Period: Cast Iron Spade-shoe and Iron Sword with Looped Pommel, Trade in the Yayoi Period, 127-137, 20010201
  49. An Archaeological Study of Exchange Systems of Ironware in Early State Formation, Japan, Cultural Changes in Early State Formation= Japan, 75-102, 20001101
  50. An Essay on Iron Trade in The Yayoi Period, Seitetsu-shi Ronbunshu (Studies on The History of Iron Making), 45-65, 20001001
  51. External Interaction and Distribution of Ironwares in the Yayoi Period: Burial Iron Goods in the Yyoi Period, The Tombs of the Kings in the “Tango” Area in the yayoi Period to the Kofun Period, 31-38, 20000801
  52. Historical Studies in Japan, 1998, Yayoi Period, Shigaku Zasshi (The Historical Society of Japan), 108(5), 22-27, 19990501
  53. The Smelting Funance in Nagaoka-Palace and Capital, The Information of the Archaeological Properties in Kyoto Prefecture, 69, 17-24, 19980901
  54. An Aspect of the Production of Ironwares from The Yayoi Period to The Kofun Period, Tatara Kenkyu (Journal of Historical Iron and Steel), 38, 1-34, 19971201
  55. Iron Implements in The Yayoi Period in The Kinki District, Archaeological Studies in Kyoto Prefecture, 3, 109-122, 19960301
  56. Socketed Iron Axes with Notched Blades from Fourth to Sixth Centuries(A.D.), Japan, kokogaku kenkyu(Quarterly of Archaeological Studies), 41(4), 53-77, 19950301
  57. Regional Differences of Iron Implements in The Late Yayoi Period, Chiefly on Arrow Heads and Pluck Knives, Koko-Ronshu= Essays on Archaeology in Honour of Hiroshi SHIOMI, 433-454, 19930301
  58. An Essay on The Fragments of The Broken Cast Iron Spade-Shoe in Ancient China, Tatara Kenkyu (Journal of Historical Iron and Steel), 32・33, 20-30, 19921001
  59. The Square-Shaped Burial Mound with Stone Pavement in The Northern Kyoto Prefecture, Archaeological Studies in Kyoto Prefecture, 2, 31-38, 19910301

Publications such as books

  1. 2018/10, Burial Mounds in Europe and Japan, Comparative and Contextual Perspectives, From the Late Yayoi period onward, new funerary rituals spread throughout the main island of the Japanese Archipelago. This new burial rites involved preparing the earthen mound prior to the digging of the grave, which increased the visual effects of the funerary ritual. Earlier before even during the Jōmon period, there had been opulent burials accompanied with grave goods, but these never developed as a continuous cultural phenomenon. This paper provides a rough overview of how Yayoi period burial mounds (funkyū bo) developed, and the process by which these burial mounds increased both in size and in the complexity of the burial facilities, leading ultimately to the emergence of keyhole-shaped mounded tombs (zenpōkoen fun) at the beginning of the Kofun period., Emergence and Development of Burial Mounds in the Yayoi Period, Archaeopress Archaeology, 2018, 10, Thomas Knopf, Werner Steinhaus, Shinya Fukunaga, et al, 978 1 78969 007 1, 225, 57-68
  2. 2018/10, Burial Mounds in Europe and Japan, Comparative and Contextual Perspectives, In the 1930s, overcoming ethnicism while the government was tightening control on free speech, a new theory emerged. According to the theory, in the chalcolithic period, iron farming implements played a decisive role in agricultural production to create surplus resources leading to social stratification. After the World War II, the Yayoi period became recognized as a process where community leaders had promoted trade and labor division by using surplus working resources and enhanced their control over communities. It was considered certain that ground stone tools such as stone knives had disappeared in the Late Yayoi period, which was interpreted as a result of the proliferation of iron farming implements. However, archaeological excavations during the Japanese high economic growth period revealed that the proliferation had been limited to the northern Kyushu Island in the latter half of the Late Yayoi period. More and more researchers casted a doubt on the established theory that forged iron implements had appeared at the same time as starting rice cultivation. Their claim gradually undermined the deductive argument that the production and use of iron farming implements to increase agricultural production had created hierarchical societies. Around 2000, large scale excavations were conducted one after another along the coast of the Japan Sea, which revealed how iron tools had been used for the production of beads and luxury wooden containers. In other words, those archaeological investigations gave a clearer picture of community leaders who had put surplus labor into the production of elaborate craftworks to conduct long distance trade. Moreover, while the globalization of archaeology was progressing, the Western anthropology such as neo-evolutionism anthropology helped the development of the (initial) nation-building theory as a new framework of historical recognition. Many researchers laid more stress on the distribution management of iron materials and implements as necessary goods than the agricultural production increased with the use of iron farm implements. On the other hand, some archaeologists voiced criticism from the viewpoints of inductive argument, which developed another assumption. Therefore, it became considered that imbalanced dependence between community leaders had been created by giving and receiving prestige goods. Furthermore, the distribution of iron materials and implements became considered to have had a close connection with the establishment of an economic base to activate the flow of goods. In summary, the above-mentioned history of studies can also be regarded as a process where the deductive argument of the role of iron culture in the formation theory of a hierarchical society and an initial nation was verified by the iron culture theory based on the inductive argument., Iron and Its Relation to Mounded Tombs on the Japanese Islands, Archaeopress Archaeology, 2018, 10, 英語, Thomas Knopf, Werner Steinhaus, Shinya Fukunaga, et al, 978 1 78969 007 1, 225, 166-172
  3. 2018/03/31, Studies of the Satadani-Satadao Burial Mounds, Vol.3 (Part of Research Investigation), In Satadani burial mound No. 3, small grave pits are distributed at the lower level of the mounding, revealing that burials were continually taking place there while the mound was being formed. Furthermore, a large grave pit over 6m in length, which constitutes the principal burial chamber, was detected in the upper mounding along with shafts and other burial facilities, and part of this pit was revealed to be overlapping with another grave pit which constitutes a peripheral burial chamber. It is therefore plausible that this burial mound can be classified as an “eclectic” style that mixes together the “concurrent progressive” and “mound-first” styles. Moreover, two pieces of earthenware were unearthed: vermilion-lacquered vessels with spout and large attached pedestal foot. These were products of the technology of the southern part of Okayama Prefecture. Interestingly, they have holes knocked into them. This feature conjures up an image of the subsequent ceremonial vessel stand (tokushu kidai), which later evolved into the cylindrical clay figures (entō haniwa) of the Kofun period). The Satadani burial mound group is the place where funeral rituals first started to involve a combination of elements such as the following: A wooden chamber (mokkaku) housing a wooden coffin is interred within the burial pit and then large red-colored pottery (like vessels with attached pedestal foot, chūkō kyaku tsuki bachi) are offered at the surface of the grave pit; round pebbles or stone slabs are distributed around the grave to serve as markers, which were become used with offering pottery in the Late Yayoi period; and the graves are arranged in such a way that a large grave pit constituting the main burial is surrounded by other smaller burials in its vicinity at the top of the mound. These elements of ritual (facilities, implements and process of the burial, etc.) are the origin of the elements of the funerary ritual observed in the large and giant Yayoi burial mounds that developed from the last third of the Late Yayoi period onward in the eastern part of Shimane Prefecture, the southern part of Okayama Prefecture, and the northern part of Kyōto Prefecture. The results of the research have provided further confirmation of the Satadani burial mound group’s forerunner-status in the development of Yayoi burial mounds. The site vividly displayed the transformation in Yayoi burial mounds that occurred from the Middle Yayoi period to the Late Yayoi period. Thus, we identify the Satadani-Satadao burial mound group as an extremely important archaeological site for studying the development, in terms of appearance and increase in size, of the Yayoi-period burial mounds. This group is not only constructed during a relatively early stage of Yayoi period graves with burial mound, but also it became obvious that this a very important site, if one is taking into consideration the development of burial mounds of Yayoi period graves. In addition, this study incorporates the interrelation of burial mound construction methods and funeral rites, thus making it a fundamental investigation from a comparative archaeological perspective regarding the research of burial mounds not only in Japan, but also overseas., Heiwa Print, 2018, 3, 日本語, Hisahi NOJIMA, Susumu MURATA, Hirotaka MAKI,Takuya IMAFUKU, Takayuki IMANISHI, 148
  4. 2017/10/31, Bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, Hiroshima University, No.9, archaeology, 2017, 10, 日本語/英語, 129
  5. 2016/12/31, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Letters, Department of Archaeology 50th Anniversary Thesis and Essay Anthologies, 2016, 2016,12, 日本語
  6. 2016/09/31, Bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, Hiroshima University, No.8, archaeology, 2016, 09, 日本語・英語, 106
  7. 2015/07/30, Bulletin of the Department at the Archaeology, Hiroshima University, No.7, archaeolgy, 2015, 07, 136
  8. 2015/03/31, Studies of the Satadani-Satadao Burial Mounds, Vol.1 (Part of Archeological Excavation), The Satadao group of graves with burial mound, where the excavations were carried out, is located in the urban area on the east side of Shōbara city in the northern part of Hiroshima Prefecture. The group was built between the end of the last third of the Middle Yayoi period (1st century BC) and the first third of the Late Yayoi period (1st century AD). A series of excavations yielded the following results: Sata-dao No. 1 and 2 are square-shaped ditch-enclosed slightly elevated burial precincts (hōkei shūkō bo); No. 3 is a grave with rectangular burial mound and four corner projections (yosumi tosshutsugata funkyū bo); No. 4 is also a grave with rectangular burial mound and four corner projections, but has subsequently been modified and altered into a square-shaped burial mound; No. 5 is a square-shaped ditch-enclosed slightly elevated burial precinct (hōkei shūkō bo), where on the inside of the ditch-enclosed space a grave pit was confirmed. Towards the end of the last third of the Middle Yayoi period after repeated burials of several individuals, the burial mound of the Sata-dao No. 3 grave was completed. At grave No. 4, which is from the same phase, in the lower strata of the burial mound the surface of the excavation of a grave pit could be confirmed. In other words, it became clear, that at the graves No. 3 and 4 with rectangular burial mound and four corner projections, grave pits were first excavated before the burial mound was finally taking shape. Then the deceased persons were buried within and thereafter the grave pits were backfilled with the soil of the pit excavation. The so repeated iterations of grave pit excavation, burial and backfilling gradually produced the mound. However, on the other hand at Sata-dao grave No.1 and 2 the burials took place after the earthworks of the mound were nearly completed. According to the results of the surveys, within the same group of graves one could confirm that the construction methods of the burial mounds changed: from the type, where the mound and the burial facilities are simultaneously constructed [co-occurrent progression type] of the end of the last third of the Middle Yayoi period to the type, where burial mound construction proceeds first [“mound first” type] of the first third of the Late Yayoi period. It became clear that is a rather rare group of graves with burial mound. This group is not only constructed during a relatively early stage of Yayoi period graves with burial mound, but also it became obvious that this a very important site, if one is taking into consideration the development of construction methods of burial mounds of Yayoi period graves. Hereafter, for an understanding of the development of construction methods of burial mounds of Yayoi period graves the site is offering important insights., Burial Mounds, Yayoi Period, Hiroshima Pref., Shobara City,, Heiwa Print, 2016, 03, 日本語, 150, 150
  9. 2012/03, CHITOSESHIMO site in Maizuru City; The Excavation of Ritual Deposit Sites in Seashore , 2012, 03, 167
  10. 2010/05, Ancient Iron Culture in East Asia, 2010, 05, 9784639021384, 187
  11. 2009/04, Japanese Archaeology in Yayoi Period , 2009, 04, 9784886214591, 254
  12. 2009/02, The Iron Culture during the Formation of the Early State, Japan, 2009, 02, 9784639020745, 312
  13. 2008/03, Archaeological Study in the Dating of Introduction and the Trade of the Chinese Casting Iron Tools in the Yayoi Period, Japan , Nishiki Print co. Ltd., 2008, 03, 128
  14. 2018/12/30, Bulletin of the Department of Archaeology, Hiroshima University, No.10, archaeology, 2018, 12, NAGAI, Kenji, MAKI, Hirotaka, SHIMOE, Hiroki, FUJISAWA, Masahiro, NAGANO, Tomoro, SUZUKI Miszuho, NAKAMURA, Norie.

Invited Lecture, Oral Presentation, Poster Presentation

  1. ironware manufacturing in the Yayoi period, Hisashi, NOJIMA, 2018/07/14, With Invitation
  2. Iron and Its Relation to Mounded Tombs on Japanese Islands, Hisashi NOJIMA, Burial Mounds in Europe and Japan, 2015/11/06, With Invitation, Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Culture, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Osaka University, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
  3. The Origins and the Development of Graves with Burial Mounds on the Japanese Islands in the Yayoi Period, Hisashi NOJIMA, Stainhaus Werner, Burial Mounds in Europe and Japan, 2015/11/05, With Invitation, Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Culture, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Osaka University, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
  4. Bi-metal Swords of Western Asia Held at the Department of Archaeology, Hiroshima University, NOJIMA, Hisashi, 2014/12/21, With Invitation, Ohara Museum, Kurashiki, Okayama Pref.